Tuberculosis in Nigeria

Executive summary

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern globally. The majority of cases are found in African countries. However, due to the prevalence of TB infection in these countries, the Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs) are said to be affected because of the increase in HIV cases; this has a great effect on TB prevalence particularly in Africa (World Health Organisation, 2006; Sustainable Development Goals, 2017). The recent studies that the World Health Organisation (WHO) (2006) had undertaken shows that the African population is around 836,669,000 in 2010, with a TB incidence of 2,299,000, with several deaths 250,000 and a prevalence rate of 2,800,000 (World Health organisation, 2006). Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) is among the major public health concerns in Nigeria. It was declared a national emergency in 2006 because of the prevalence rate of PTB, after which the plan for TB control was developed (Federal Ministry of Health Nigeria, 2008).

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EXPLORING THE ISSUES SURROUNDING SICKLE CELL DISEASE IN NIGERIA

Introduction

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic condition of general public health significance. SCD is a common hereditary illness which has significant effects on individual’s health, it is a condition that affect the function or structure of haemoglobin in the body (Nnaji, et al., 2013; Ola, et al., 2016). However, children inherit the disease from their biological parents, this happened when both parents have an abnormal haemoglobin SS genes (HbSS) unlike a normal haemoglobin AA (HbAA). The child will become anaemic also known as sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (Nnaji, et al., 2013). Also, a child can be a carrier (sickle cell trait) of the disease when one of his parents is a sufferer (HbSS) and the other has an HbAA gene.

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