Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

Getting the news that you have cancer can be overwhelming, stressful and emotionally displeasing, however getting informed that your child has cancer can be devastating as a parent. It will be an overwhelming and confusing couple of days before coming to terms with the news. Cancer.gov have produce a guideline article to help parents, patients and healthcare workers understand childhood cancer.

We’ve talked about ‘’blood cancer’’ which cover the basis of cancer and how it comes to existence. This will be the continuation or a further explanation of cancer in relation to children. Cancer is a group of many related diseases, not just one. The term ‘’cancer’’ is used to describe a group of disease in which abnormal cells divide without control, invade nearby tissues and spread to other part of the body through the blood and lymph systems.

Cancer in children are different from cancers in adults. The part of the body that cancer start to occur is different in both children and adults. The most common childhood cancers are brain, leukaemia and other central nervous system tumors and lymphoma. Together, these cancers account for more than half of all cancers diagnosed in children but only small percentage of the cancers diagnosed in adults.

The causes of childhood cancers are not well understood. However, some number of cancers cases are due to genetic abnormalities, the causes of most childhood cancers are unknown. Regardless of age, race and economic background any child can get cancer. Luckily, more children survive cancer now than ever before due to new and better treatments options. Today, more than 80% of children and adolescents (under 20 years) who are diagnosed with cancer survive for at least 5 years after the diagnosis. Regrettably, survival rates for some childhood cancer is still low. Most of the improvement in childhood cancer survival rate is due to clinical trials that have taken place over the past decades.

For more on this, click here and thank you for your time.

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